Destinations

I am creating a new blog series called “Destinations” which will offer detailed descriptions of fun places for hands-on STEM learning for kids age 3 – 10, such as children’s museums, science museums and more. The majority of these will be in the Pacific Northwest, as that’s where I live. But when we travel and visit fun destinations, I’ll write about those too.

I’ve created a google map showing many of these destinations, called “Science Museums of the Northwest.”

Here’s some posts from my other blog about places that are worth checking out:

KidsQuest Children’s Museum in Bellevue, WA (a suburb of Seattle) A climber that’s 25-30 feet tall, a water zone with a magnetic water wall, a vortex, and a stream to dam, a working conveyor belt system, a semi truck cab to climb into, a room for building with recyclables, a farm area and a mercantile from 100 years ago, a huge train table, a “story tree”, art studio with a kiln, and a toddler zone. (Pro Tip: If you’re choosing between a visit to the Seattle Children’s Musuem and KidsQuest, choose KidsQuest!)

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Kid’s Discovery Museum on Bainbridge Island, WA. This museum and the town of Bainbridge make for a fun day trip on the ferry from downtown Seattle. A climber, a rock climbing wall, dress-up and pretend play in “the bank”, the “grocery store”, “doctor’s office” and “on the ferry.” Upstairs are big blocks, puppets, a train table and a physics zone full of ramps to roll balls down and launch balls off of.

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Mindport in Bellingham, WA: Click on that link to find all the details, but here’s my intro: “It’s a little like an art gallery full of beautifully crafted exhibits… but you get to touch and interact with everything! It’s a little like a children’s museum where children are welcomed… but the exhibits are intriguing enough that all the adults in the room were as engaged as the kids. It’s like a science museum with exhibits that illustrate scientific concepts – and binders that explain the details… but it’s prettier, and somehow more soothing and meditative, than any science museum I’ve been in.”

 

 

 

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